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The New York Times Is Suing Microsoft And OpenAI Over Copyright Infringement 

OpenAI and Microsoft are being sued by the New York Times over copyright infringement, alleging that the two companies’ artificial intelligence technology has illegally copied millions of articles from the Times to train AI services like ChatGPT.

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China Looking To Limit Phone Time For Minors To Two Hours A Day 

China is proposing new measures that would limit that amount of time minors spend on their phones as a part of their initiative to curb internet addiction and “cultivate good morality and socialist values,” according to reports

The proposal came from the Cyberspace Administration of China, the nation’s top internet regulator. The proposal requires all mobile devices, apps, and app stores to have a built in “minor mode” that would limit daily screen time for kids and teens to a maximum of two hours a day, depending on the specific age group. 

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These restrictions, if approved, will add onto current measures that were passed as a part of Beijing’s effort to limit screen time among kids and reduce their “exposure to undesirable information,” according to CNN.

The proposal’s rules will be open for public discussion until September 2nd. If it were to pass, kids and teens using devices on minor mode will have all of their applications close automatically once their time limits are up. Also, no one under the age of 18 will be able to access their screens from 10 pm to 6 am. 

Children under the age of eight will be able to use their phones for only 40 minutes a day while kids between the ages of eight and 16 will get an hour. Teenagers between the ages of 16 and 18 will be allotted two hours. 

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After using their devices for 30 minutes, all age groups will receive a reminder to rest. The Cyberspace Administration also thinks “mobile internet service providers should actively create content that disseminates core socialist values  and forges a sense of community of the Chinese nation,” according to the draft.

Certain educational services as well as emergency services will not be impacted by the time limits. 

According to CNN, parents are on board with the proposal. “I think it’s good. On the one hand, it can protect their vision as many young kids cannot stop themselves while watching something they like. On the other hand, it’s easier for us parents to control our kids’ screen time. Most importantly the content under the minor mode is more positive and healthy,” one parent said. 

According to the China Internet Network Information Center, China has one of the world’s largest internet user bases, with about 1.07 billion users out of a population of 1.4 billion. One in five users were 19 years old or younger, as of December 2022. 

Kiyoshi Hamada Toshiba

Changing the Landscape of Mass Production and International Business | Kiyoshi Hamada

Modern advances in communication have resulted in unprecedented global connectivity. With the advent of the internet, the entire world has become a marketplace for the free flow of information and technology. The difficulty of such a feat is easy to overlook. Even as a young man, Kiyoshi Hamada was determined to develop and implement novel approaches to mass manufacturing and business.

tiktok

US and TikTok Draft Deal To Resolve National Security Concerns

The Biden Administration and social media platform TikTok are drafting a deal to resolve concerns over the company’s data policies and its threat to U.S. national security. TikTok is owned by the Chinese company ByteDance.

The resolution would allow ByteDance to keep ownership of the company but would make changes to its “data security and governance,” according to The New York Times. The two parties are still negotiating the terms of the deal, which aims to protect American data from the Chinese government.

The Justice Department is steering the negotiations with TikTok. Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco, who was also a national security official in President Obama’s administration, believes that the current agreement terms are not rigorous enough to adequately protect national security. The Treasury Department is also involved in the negotiations and is skeptical that the deal will sufficiently protect American data. The Treasury Department plays a significant role in approving agreements that have the potential to incite national security vulnerabilities.

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The hesitancy from the government may drag out the final resolution for months. TikTok’s CEO Shou Zi Chew insists that the company is not interested in sharing U.S. data with the Chinese government and considers itself a “separate US-based entity subject to U.S. laws.” Chew asserts that TikTok has “not provided U.S. user data to the CCP, nor would we if asked.”

“Employees outside the U.S., including China-based employees, can have access to TikTok U.S. user data subject to a series of robust cybersecurity controls and authorization approval protocols overseen by our US-based security team.”

However, ByteDance still owns TikTok, and some ByteDance employees can still access TikTok user data. With midterms set for November, politicians turned their attention back to the security issue.

According to the deal, TikTok would store its American data on U.S. servers, likely run by the tech company Oracle, instead of its servers in Singapore and Virginia. Oracle would monitor TikTok algorithms for foreign government interference in user content recommendations. The worry is that the Chinese government will be able to use those recommendations to influence American users and politics. TikTok would also have to create a board of security experts to report to the U.S. government to oversee its actions.

Jake Williams, a former National Security Agency hacker, spoke about how Chinese government access to U.S. data creates a power imbalance between the two countries.

“Let’s assume for a second that U.S. intelligence has access to WeChat. They would have to fight hard for that access, and it would constantly be at risk of discovery and neutralization. China, on the other hand, doesn’t have to fight for access to TikTok; they have it by statutory authority.”

Williams continues, “the potential for Chinese data collection across the platform is a larger concern, especially when combined with other data already acquired by Chinese state actors.”

TikTok announced last week that it would ban political fundraising on its platform to prevent politicians from using it to grow their campaigns.

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In 2020, former President Donald Trump tried to force the sale of TikTok over similar national security concerns. TikTok initially agreed to sell a part of TikTok to Oracle, but the deal never came to fruition. The Biden Administration is taking a more nuanced approach to regulating the company’s access to American data.

Kian Vesteinsson, a research analyst for the nonprofit Freedom House, which advocates for political freedom, said that “there are definitely signs that Chinese influence efforts are likely to grow, linked to the Chinese government’s strategy more broadly of digital authoritarianism.”

“But it’s important for us to acknowledge that the U.S. government has its own shadowy national security surveillance authorities. And in recent years, U.S. government agencies have monitored social media accounts of people coordinating protests in the U.S. and done things like searched electronic devices throughout the country and at the border. These sorts of tactics undermine the idea that this is only a foreign threat.”