Facebook Whistleblower To Testify In Front Of Senate Regarding Company’s Impact On Kids

Frances Haugen is a former Facebook product manager, who was recently identified as the Facebook whistleblower who released tens of thousands of pages of research and documents that indicate the company was more than aware of the various negative impacts its platforms have, particularly on young girls. 

Haugen worked on civic integrity issues within the company. Now, Haugen will be questioned by a Senate Commerce subcommittee about what Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, knew regarding its effects on young users and a multitude of other issues. 

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“I believe what I did was right and necessary for the common good — but I know Facebook has infinite resources, which it could use to destroy me. I came forward because I recognized a frightening truth: almost no one outside of Facebook knows what happens inside Facebook.”

Haugen previously shared a series of documents with regulators at the Wall Street Journal, which published a multi-part investigation on Facebook, showing the platform was aware of the problems within its apps, including the negative effects of misinformation’s and the harm caused by Instagram on young users. 

“When we realized tobacco companies were hiding the harm it caused, the government took action. When we figured out cars were safer with seat belts, the government took action. And today, the government is taking action against companies that hid evidence on opioids. I implore you to do the same here. Facebook’s leadership won’t make the necessary changes because they have put their immense profits before people,” she explained. 

This is not the first time Facebook will be subject to Congressional hearings regarding its power and influence over its users. Haugen’s upcoming testimony will speak to the overall issue of social media platforms and the amount of power they have in regards to personal data and privacy practices. 

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Haugen discussed how her goal isn’t to bring down Facebook, but to reform it from the toxic traits that continue to exist today. Around a month ago Haugen filed at least eight complaints to the Securities and Exchange Commission. The complaints alleged that the company is hiding research about its shortcomings from investors, and of course, the public. 

Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal, who chairs the Senate Commerce subcommittee on consumer protection, released a statement this Sunday after Haugen’s appearance on “60 Minutes” where she identified herself as the whistleblower.

“From her [Haugen’s] first visit to my office, I have admired her backbone and bravery in revealing terrible truths about one of the world’s most powerful, implacable corporate giants. We now know about Facebook’s destructive harms to kids … because of documents Frances revealed.”

Following the Wall Street Journal’s investigative piece on Facebook, Antigone Davis, the company’s global head of safety, was questioned by members of the same Senate subcommittee, specifically in regards to Facebook’s impact on young users. Davis tried to downplay the idea that these reports are being seen as a “bombshell” by the public, and didn’t commit to releasing a fully detailed research report, to defend Facebook’s side of the argument, due to “privacy considerations.”

“Facebook’s actions make clear that we cannot trust it to police itself. We must consider stronger oversight, effective protections for children, and tools for parents, among the needed reforms,” Senator Blumenthal added.