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Vogue World Will Donate £2 Million To London-Based Art Organizations

Condé Nast has announced that Vogue World will donate £2 million to London-based arts organizations through a newly established fund.

London’s Theater Royal Drury Lane hosted the Vogue World event last Thursday night. Organized by Vogue’s editor-in-chief, Anna Wintour, and Bafta/Olivier-winning director Stephen Daldry, the aim of the evening was to celebrate London’s history and heritage as a fashion landmark, and raise money for the UK’s performing arts scene. 

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According to reports from The Guardian, artists such as Stormzy, Annie Lennox, Cush Jumbo, Damian Lewis, Sienna Miller, Kate Moss, and FKA Twigs performed for a crowd of A-list celebrities and fashion/entertainment public figures. 

“Vogue will be donating 100% of net proceeds from ticket sales to arts and cultural organizations in London in the form of grants. In addition to ticket proceeds, Vogue is working with a number of organizations and donors to increase donations to the fund through individual contributions.”

21 organizations will be receiving grants that can be utilized for anything related to their core mission and objectives. Some of the organizations receiving these grants include the Royal Opera House, the Royal Ballet, Southbank Sinfonia, and the Rambert dance company. 

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Reports state that the grants were written and provided to three different categories of organizations, the first being Vogue World’s cultural partners who helped produce the event. The other two categories are small diverse organizations in London and organizations that support freelancers in London’s performing arts. 

The show itself was 37 minutes long and was live streamed around the world, kicking off London’s fashion week. 

Before the event itself, Wintour gave a speech describing Vogue World:

“The arts are under threat in the UK, Vogue World is a timely reminder of how important they are, how vital a part of our lives, and how much they need our support.”

runway

Denni Francisco Is The First Indigenous Designer To Host A Solo Show At Australia Fashion Week 

Australia fashion week will host its first solo show for an Indigenous designer in its 23-year history this May. Denni Francisco of the Indigenous clothing label Ngali is gearing up to hold her first solo show in an honor she’s calling “exciting, exhilarating, and a little bit terrifying.”

“When you’re the first at doing something it comes with a degree of responsibility. There are cultural elements that come with everything we do, so it’s not just the creativity, it’s about ensuring it all comes together in a culturally appropriate way.”

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Francisco is a proud Wiradjuri woman, and has won designer of the year at the National Indigenous Fashion Awards twice. 

This will mark the third time Francisco has had a showing at Australian Fashion Week, but will be the first time she’s had her own standalone show; previously she was featured as one of six designers on the Indigenous Fashion Projects runway show. 

Francisco previously was able to show between 6-8 designs during her featured showings in 2021 and 2022, this year, however, she’s planning a show of 30 looks in what she’s referred to as a “collective effort” between her and her team. 

“We’re already talking to the First Nations accessory designers and looking at what we can do with them. Everything that Ngali does, we’re looking at how we can bring in more of our mob, so it won’t just be Ngali. It will be more of our creatives coming together,” she explained. 

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Australia’s Fashion Week this year will present 45 designers over a five-year program, a slightly more scaled down plan when compared to previous fashion weeks. 

Natalie Xenita of global entertainment conglomerate IMG, which has staged Australian fashion week since 2005, said “this schedule was based on feedback from the industry. We’ve been careful to curate the schedule this year so that it’s … manageable, and that each designer that’s showing can get their cut through.”

For the past two years of Australian Fashion Week, IMG didn’t charge designers to participate in the program, a rule that will continue into this year’s showing. 

“It’s a really important long-term strategy for us, because the industry is still recovering from the massive impact of the pandemic,” Xenita explained. 

westwood

Vivienne Westwood’s Legacy Lives On In Paris Fashion Week Show, Just Weeks After Her Death

Vivienne Westwood’s widower and collaborator, Andreas Kronthaler, says the new Vivienne Westwood collection shown during Paris Fashion Week was a tribute to her legacy.

fashion

Kanye West Wears ‘White Lives Matter’ Shirt at Yeezy Fashion Show

Kanye West donned a shirt bearing “White Lives Matter” on its back at his popup fashion show during Paris Fashion Week. He sent several models, some of whom are Black, with t-shirts sharing the same slogan down the runway at his YZYSZN9 show.

The Anti-Defamation League recognizes the slogan as one that is commonly used by white supremacist groups, including the KKK. The Southern Poverty Law Center also acknowledges the “movement” as an extremist group.

“White Lives Matter, a racist response to the civil rights movement Black Lives Matter, is a neo-Nazi group that is growing into a movement as more and more white supremacist groups take up its slogans and tactics.”

Kanye West, who has legally changed his name to Ye, is no stranger to controversy. He made headlines in 2018 after implying slavery was a choice during his interview with radio host Charlamagne Tha God.

Selah Marley, Lauryn Hill’s daughter and Bob Marley’s granddaughter, was among the models who modeled the garment. Candace Owens, a conservative political commentator, sat in the audience wearing a shirt with the same slogan.

The rumors of the popup fashion show began a few days before the Balenciaga mud show, where Ye made his runway debut. On Monday, the Avenue de la Grande Armée was packed with fans.

According to the NYTimes, “Anna Wintour came. So did John Galliano. Demna, the Balenciaga designer, and Cédric Charbit, its chief executive. Alexandre Arnault, the chief marketing officer of Tiffany & Company and a son of the LVMH chieftain Bernard Arnault.”

The show featured a live choir with a host of children from Ye’s Donda Academy in California, including  Ye’s daughter North.

Jaden Smith, who was also in the audience, walked out after the shirts came down the runway, later tweeting his support of the BLM movement, stating “I had to dip” and “we demand a more progressive future.”

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Gabriella Karefa-Johnson, the vogue editor, called it “indefensible behavior” on Instagram. In a series of stories, she shared screenshots of her thoughts on what happened.

“I know what he was trying to do. He was trying to illustrate a dystopian world in the future when whiteness might become extinct or at least would be in enough danger to demand defense…it didn’t land, and it was deeply offensive, violent and dangerous. The danger is that this very premise, the idea that white supremacy is in danger of extinction, is what justifies mass incarceration, murder en masse, indeed even the advent of slavery. The idea that blackness must be snuffed out for it will surely supersede whiteness in power and influence if given the chance, and it’s so hugely irresponsible to furnish the most dangerous extremists with this kind of fiction narrative.”

Kanye responded to the criticism by taking to Instagram and posting screenshots of the writer online.

“This is not a fashion person You speak on Ye Ima speak on you Ask Trevor Noah.”

Model Gigi Hadid came to the writer’s defense, commenting on Ye’s post.

 “You wish u had a percentage of her intellect. You have no idea, haha…. If there’s actually a point to any of your s–t. She might be the only person that could save u. As if the ‘honor’ of being invited to your show should keep someone from giving their opinion? Lol. You’re a bully and a joke.”

She also reposted a statement from José Criales-Unzueta, a Vogue employee, on her Instagram story.

“I was trying very hard not to give that man air time, but publicly bullying someone who criticizes your work on your massive platform is another level of ridiculousness to me. If you can’t take it, don’t dish it. If you can’t take criticism, especially the smart, nuanced, and kind criticism that GKJ provided yesterday’s show, then don’t put work out for public consecution.”

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Ye doubled down on his comments.

“Everyone knows that Black Lives Matter was a scam. Now it’s over. You’re welcome.”

Ye also accused LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault of killing fashion designer Virgil Abloh.

“SPANK MY HAND WITH THE RULER(S) I’LL GO SIT IN THE ‘PRINCIPAL(S)’ OFFICE. CAN’T WE TALK ABOUT MORE IMPORTANT THINGS? LIKE HOW LATE THE SHOW WAS, OR HOW BERNARD ARNAULT KILLED MY BEST FRIEND.”

Tremaine Emory, the creative director of Supreme, responded, “I gotta draw the line at you using Virgil’s death in your ‘ye’ is the victim campaign in front your sycophant peanut algorithm gallery.”

“This time last year you said Virgil’s designs are a disgrace to the black community in front of all your employees at Yeezy -ASK LUCETTE HOLLAND…I GOT ALL THE ‘RECEIPTS’ ( don’t let me get into the things you said about v after his death)

Ye tell the ppl why you didn’t get invited to Virgil’s actual funeral the one before the public one at the museum( and why you weren’t allowed to speak at the public funeral). You knew Virgil had terminal cancer and you rode on him in group chats, at Yeezy, interviews…YOU ARE SO BROKEN. KEEP VIRGIL NAME OUT YOUR MOUTH…KEEP @gabriellak_j NAME OUT YOUR MOUTH…Your not a victim your just an insecure narcissist that’s dying for validation from the fashion world…take care…at least we’ll always have ‘UGANDA’.”

TikTok on Screen

TikTok To Host Month-Long Virtual Fashion Event 

This time of year is typically when Fashion Weeks all over the world would be starting. Some cities are finding virtual or socially distanced alternatives to keep the shows from being fully cancelled, while some other unlikely platforms are creating their own fashion events for those stuck at home. Recently, social media platform TikTok announced they would be hosting their own fashion month as a “digital innovation aimed at rivaling the physical fashion weeks.” 

TikTok is competing with the likes of Instagram, the social media app mainly known for sharing fashionable content. The month-long event will begin this Friday, September 18th, and will end on October 8th. The shows are projected to feature a variety of hashtags and live videos from designer labels such as Louis Vuitton, Saint Laurent, Alice and Olivia, and more. Users can simply open TikTok and scroll through a variety of hashtags and show titles to see some of their favorite designers, and even some new unheard of ones. 

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Many industries have begun using TikTok in general to promote their work/business as the platform has grown monumentally within the past year alone. Jessica Schiffer is the contributing editor of Vogue Business who recently spoke with the media about why bigger industry names were hesitant at first to use the app. 

“I think fashion labels were unsure of TikTok’s marketing potential. The lack of stylization probably seemed antithetical to fashion, which loves the polished confines of platforms like Instagram.”

However, this past summer the fashion industry was completely flipped on its head, like the rest of the world, with the Covid-19 pandemic. Without the normal retail advertising and in-person promotions that can propel a brand into mainstream success, many labels found themselves struggling. 

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The idea of online shopping has obviously taken over within the past few years, however, now brands are realizing it has to account for a majority of their advertising, selling, and distribution. Brands began releasing short artsy minute-long clips as a replacement for real-life fashion events, and eventually TikTok began creating fashion trends and launching them into the mainstream faster than ever before. 

Some examples of the fashion movements that have gained billions of views on the app include the cottagecore aesthetic, a hashtag that has gained over 3 billion views, and the more dark-sided Dark Academia goth aesthetic; which has gained over 61 million views. CeCe Vu is the fashion content partnership leader at TikTok who recently released a statement about their fashion month and why the platform is so beneficial for artists and creators. 

“We’ve seen the fashion industry reinvent what luxury fashion means to culture and society through TikTok by bringing fashion into the homes of our community during quarantine. TikTok is where authenticity meets creativity and people are genuinely comfortable sharing their true selves.”

About 70% of all TikTok users are 13-24 years old, which at first was seen as a negative in regards to fashion marketing, however, these kids are also teaching their parents how to use the app and indirectly influencing them on their purchases. TikTok hopes their fashion event will be no different, and older generations will embrace the future of fashion technology and all it has to offer.