Getting Vaccine

US On Track To Begin Vaccinating Kids Aged 5 To 11 By November 

According to Dr. Anthony Fauci the US is currently on track to start vaccinating children aged 5 to 11 by early to mid-November. An advisory committee with the FDA is meeting today to vote on the use of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for the younger age group. 

Last week, a review panel for the FDA found that the benefits of the shots in young kids outweigh the risks. Currently the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for all US teens 12 and older. 

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The FDA announced on Friday that the vaccine showed a general efficacy rate of 90.7% against symptomatic infection in nearly 2,300 elementary-school-age children seven days after they got the shot. The most common side effects appeared after the second dose which included pain at the injection site, fatigue, and headache. No serious events have been reported in young children from the vaccine. 

Covid in general isn’t as much of a risk for children as it is for older individuals, however, more than 630 individuals under the age of 18 have died due to the virus in the US, according to the CDC. Additionally, nearly 6.2 million children have been infected with the coronavirus and more than 1.1 million of those were caused by the Delta variant. 

Moderna said early Monday that a “Phase 2/3 clinical study of its COVID vaccine in 5- to 11-year-olds generated a robust neutralizing antibody response.” The company also said it plans to submit the clinical data to the FDA in the “near term.” 

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According to a New York Times tracker, the US is continuing to average more than 1,500 Covid-related deaths a day, however, hospitalization rates are declining. The US is averaging about 75,000 new cases a day, which is less than half what it was in early September, according to the tracker. 

Most cases and deaths are occurring among the unvaccinated, causing experts to continue to urge skeptical groups to get their inoculations and avoid dying a preventable death. Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Colorado are all hotspots in the US right now. 

According to the CDC, about 190.6 million people in the US are fully vaccinated, which is equivalent to about 57.4% of the population. Experts are still adamant that the nation needs to pass the 70% mark in order to truly stop the spread of this virus. Vaccine mandates have begun being enforced throughout many different sectors of business, and the government.