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law

Judge Rules That Idaho Cannot Enforce Ban On Gender-Affirming Care For Transgender Youth 

A federal judge has ruled that Idaho cannot enforce a law that would ban transgender minors from receiving gender-affirming care such as puberty blockers and hormone treatments. This is being hailed as a major victory for the families who had sued the state initially challenging the law.

This past Tuesday, US District Judge B. Lynn Winmill wrote a preliminary order that stated the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution guarantees equal protection and due process to give the parents the right to get gender-affirming care for their children. 

“Transgender children should receive equal treatment under the law. Parents should have the right to make the most fundamental decisions about how to care for their children.”

“We’re thankful the court saw the danger this law represented to our clients and we’re determined to fight this ban until Idaho is a safe place to raise every family,” Li Nowlin-Sohl of the American Civil Liberties Union, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, said in a statement.

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Idaho initially passed a law banning puberty blockers, hormones or surgeries that would “affirm the child’s perception of the child’s sex if that perception is inconsistent with the child’s biological sex.”

Idaho is one of about 20 Republican-led states that have either banned or restricted gender-affirming treatments.

In May, two families with transgender daughters who were receiving hormone therapy sued the state, claiming the law would cut off medically necessary care for their children, and violated their rates, according to NBC News. 

Winmill wrote that the treatments the law is banning were “safe, effective, and medically necessary for some adolescents,” while he granted the motion to block the laws enforcement. 

There are many courts throughout the US that are divided on the legal challenges of gender-affirming bans. Many lower level courts throughout the nation, however, have blocked the bans so far, with multiple appeals being made in response.

pride

LGBTQ+ Activists Want Better From Companies Who Promote Equality During Pride Month

After Target announced that it would be removing products from their Pride collections and moving the displays in other stores throughout the South, LGBTQ+ activist groups have been calling out large companies and corporations to establish campaigns without caving to anti-LGBTQ+ groups. 

California state senator Scott Wiener, a member of the LGBTQ legislative caucus, stated “we need a strategy on how to deal with corporations that are experiencing enormous pressure to throw LGBTQ people under the bus.” 

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“We need to send a clear message to corporate America that if you’re our ally – if you are truly our ally – you need to be our ally, not just when it’s easy but also when it’s hard.”

Target stated their decision to remove displays were made to ensure their employees safety after multiple protestors knocked over Pride displays and confronted workers in stores. However, activists are stating this isn’t the time to back down from hatred, as the nation is in the midst of multiple battles with the community and its rights. 

This year alone in America, there have been nearly 500 anti-LGBTQ+ bills introduced in state legislatures, and at least 18 states have enacted laws that restrict and/or ban gender-affirming care for transgender youth. 

“We are forced to think differently about how we handle security at our events and whether or not we can post our staff’s names and emails on our website,” said Janson Wu, executive director of LGBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders.

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Bud Light has made headlines as well recently after their partnership with transgender influencer Dylan Mulvaney, who posted a picture of a Bud Light can with her face on it, which led to a lot of hateful transphobic backlash. 

Anheuser-Busch, Bud Light’s parent company, stated it “never intended to be part of a discussion that divides people,” signaling no clear support of Mulvaney or the LGBTQ+ community. Several gay bars in Chicago specifically responded by refusing to sell Anheuser-Busch products since they went back on their pride campaign. 

“Since Anheuser-Busch does not support us, we will not support it,” said the company.

The largest gay bar in the Midwest, Sidetrack, also made a statement regarding Anheuser-Busch “wrongfully validating the position that it is acceptable to acquiesce to the demands of those who do not support the trans community and wish to erase LGBTQ+ visibility.”

“Now’s not the time to back down. I think both business and us as citizens need to look within ourselves into new strategies. The old models aren’t necessarily working,” said Brian K. Bond, executive director of PFLAG, an organization advocating for LGBTQ+ people and their families.