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flooding

$34B of US Real Estate May Be Fully or Partially Underwater by 2050

Rising waters due to climate change could engulf $34 billion in US real estate within the next 30 years.

According to a report from the nonprofit Climate Central, up to 650,000 properties will be underwater or partially below the tidal boundary level within 30 years. Thirty counties across the country will lose more than 10% of their useable land, and 100 counties will lose at least 2% of their usable land.

The states most affected will lose a sizable portion of their total dry landmass. These states include Louisiana (8%), Florida (1.8%), North Carolina (1.3%) and Texas (0.2%).

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Rising waters will likely make these locations less desirable to live and work in, causing property values to plummet. Property taxes are an integral part of a municipal’s budget. They pay for many community social services, including schools, fire protection, emergency services, transport and other governmental aids.

Taxes also fund disaster relief and the subsequent costs of rising sea levels. New infrastructure, building safeguards against rising tides and relocating entire communities cost money. The aftermath of a rise in waters will quickly deplete many localities of their necessary funding.

“Property taxes fund local government operations, which typically include services such as K-12 schooling, roads and other infrastructure, police and fire protection, water, waste management, sewers, public transit, parks and public housing. Quality public services at competitive tax rates are key to attracting and retaining residents and businesses, which in turn support local tax revenues. Diminished property values and a smaller tax base can lead to lower tax revenues and reduced public services–a potential downward spiral of disinvestment and population decline, reduced tax base and public services and so on.”

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Seas will rise 8 to 23 inches along the nation’s coasts by 2050. The East Coast, particularly the Southeast, will be hit the hardest. Due to the sediment that flows in from the Mississippi River and the drilling for oil and gas pipelines, the gulf coast will be hit even harder by rising water levels and sinking ground.

Mark Rupp, director of the adaptation program at Georgetown Climate Center, points out that insurance carriers are reluctant to serve the Florida market, have become insolvent or have pulled out from the state entirely.

“How many mortgage lenders want to be lending for mortgages in flood-prone areas if they don’t think they’re going to be paid back?”

Rupp emphasizes that it is essential that these communities can rely on their state and federal governments to pay attention, fund their communities and provide a plan.

According to NASA, the earth’s climate has changed at a rate unseen in the past 10,000 years. The current rate of global warming is “occurring roughly ten times faster than the average rate of warming after an ice age.” The carbon dioxide we release is “increasing about 250 times faster than it did from natural sources after the last Ice Age.”

glacier

Doomsday Glacier Could Melt Rapidly With’ Just a Small Kick,’ Scientists Say

A glacier the size of Florida could melt at a faster rate than previously anticipated. The Thwaites Glacier, located in Antarctica, has been dubbed the “doomsday” glacier because of its potential to markedly raise already rising sea levels.

The glacier could raise sea levels by 2 feet or more if melted. Its precarious location in contact with warm ocean currents makes it even more susceptible to collapse.

Scientists made the discovery after a team of researchers from the U.S., Sweden, and the United Kingdom conducted a study to determine the fastest rates the glacier has retreated in the past. Dr. Robert Larter, one of the study’s co-authors, noted the significance of the findings in the study’s release.

“Thwaites is really holding on today by its fingernails, and we should expect to see big changes over small timescales in the future — even from one year to the next — once the glacier retreats beyond a shallow ridge in its bed.”

The glacier is the widest on earth, sitting at 80 miles wide. It protects the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, acting as a buffer between the sheet and warming waters. The entire West Antarctic Ice Sheet could raise sea levels by up to 16 feet.

For the study, the researchers sent an autonomous vehicle to the glacier’s former grounding zone. The grounding zone of a glacier is where an attached ice shelf transitions into a floating ice shelf. The autonomous vehicle, named Rán, was equipped with two geophysical sensors and used to produce 3D scans of the underwater surface.

These scans allowed scientists to map the glacier’s movements throughout the last 200 years. Previously, scientists could only see its movements within the past 30 years because of satellite imagery limitations.

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The study aimed to learn about the glacier’s past retreat rates to more accurately predict the rate at which it may continue to retreat. The scientists found that the glacier is capable of retreating more rapidly than previously thought. Sometime in the last 200 years, it had retreated at twice the rate it did between 2011 and 2019.

The leader of the mission, University of Florida’s Dr. Alastair Graham, warned that while the slower rate is seemingly positive, the findings confirm that the glacier is highly perceptible to changes in climate. Since the rate of the glacier retreating has pulsated, it is likely to happen again.

“Our results suggest that sustained pulses of rapid retreat have occurred at Thwaites Glacier in the past two centuries. Similar rapid retreat pulses are likely to occur in the near future when the grounding zone migrates back off stabilizing high points on the sea floor.”

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Dr. Graham said that once the glacier retreats beyond a certain point, it has the potential to shrink at an even greater rate. In fact, “just a small kick to Thwaites could lead to a big response,” Dr. Graham predicted.

These findings rebut the hope once held by scientists that the Antarctic ice sheets would be more resilient to climate change.

flooding

Pakistan’s Largest City Experiences Torrential Rain And Major Flooding Due To Climate Crisis 

Karachi, Pakistan’s largest city, is experiencing extreme torrential rain and flash flooding causing a multitude of public services and businesses to close down over safety concerns. Infrastructural damage and flooding has left at least 15 individuals dead since this weekend. 

This past Sunday, Karachi experienced 2.3 inches of rain, which is equivalent to the average of an entire month’s worth of rainfall for the area. Every summer Pakistan endures heavy monsoon rains, but more recently experts have been warning that climate change is accelerating and intensifying existing weather patterns. 

Sherry Rehman, Pakistan’s climate change minister, issued flash flood warnings for citizens in more than 14 cities and townships. 

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“Since the monsoon season began last month more than 300 people have been killed by heavy rains across Pakistan,” according to Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority. 

The 16 million residents of Karachi have witnessed entire neighborhoods become partially submerged from flooding. Photos from the area show individuals knee-deep in muddy flood water with vehicles left completely stranded and submerged. 

“Infrastructure including bridges, highways and roads have been damaged, disrupting traffic and upending the lives of millions across the city. Many have stocked up on fuel for their generators in case of power outages,”  said Afia Salam, a climate change advocate in Karachi.

“Climate change is a threat. We are a coastal city. It’s happening so fast and we will bear the brunt. People need to see the situation beyond individual events like a bridge falling or a road getting flooded.”

“The rapidity of these events is increasing and our response is not keeping pace. We are being reactive to individual events. Strategies need to be put in place, the poorest and most vulnerable are on the front line of the crisis,” said Salam.

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“Karachi, the country’s financial capital, boasts luxury hotels, malls and upmarket gated communities. But disparities in wealth and development remain, and an estimated 50% of its residents are forced to live in informal settlements,” according to the World Bank.

“Karachi’s infrastructure is highly vulnerable to climate-related disasters,” according to the World Bank.

Experts are stating that the climate crisis in Pakistan is also being exacerbated by poor flood management and ineffective disaster response. 

Extreme weather events in South Asia are becoming more frequent due to climate change, with temperatures in parts of India and Pakistan reaching record highs during a heat wave in April and May. 

According to a 2022 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), they had “medium confidence that heat waves and humidity stress would become more intense and frequent, and annual and summer monsoon precipitation will increase.”

According to the IPCC India and Pakistan are among the countries that are expected to be the most affected by climate change.

Green Heart Lifestyle

Could Greener Lifestyles Lead To Greater Happiness? Studies Suggest So

For those that try to keep the Earth green and prosperous, you may have some good feelings coming your way as a “thank you” from Mother Nature. According to studies, research shows that there may be a positive relationship between pro-environmental behaviors and overall wellbeing.

As Cardiff University senior research fellow Stuart Capstick explained, there are a number of reasons for this connection. One could be that taking the steps to protect and better the environment fulfills our basic psychological needs, “such as the sense that we are making a useful contribution to the world or acting on our own values and concerns.”

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Capstick noted that kind of logic can also act in the opposite way. People who are in a better state of mind are more likely to pay attention to the environment surrounding them, acting in a way that will benefit everyone rather than just themselves.

In the study that Capstick was an author of, the research went beyond the relationship between environmentalism and wellbeing. Instead, they focused on whether this positive influence was only obtainable in wealthy countries, or if privilege is a nonexistent factor.

Studying 7,000 people in over several different countries like India, the U.K., and Denmark, the research found that regardless of their home and wealth, people that committed environmentally friendly acts — from reducing food waste to donating to environmental campaigns — had their wellbeing positively affected.

“At the personal level, the connection between green behaviour and wellbeing was as pronounced for those on lower incomes as those in higher income brackets,” Capstick said. He also added that regardless of how materialistic or selflessness people claimed themselves to be, their wellbeing rose the same regardless in the event of a environmental action.

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The key difference between countries found by Capstick and co. was that nations with a “more collectivist social organisation,” such as Brazil and China, had a “particularly profounding” wellbeing impact on those who participating in eco-friendly activities as a group.

Considering the data, then, would seem to suggest that a very simple way of improving your mental state is to take the steps to benefit the world around you. Luckily, there is plenty of flexibility when it comes to the actions that can make a difference.

According to BBC, looking for eco-friendly clothes — like cotton over polyester — and shopping at second-hand stores is a great way to bolster both your closet and your sense of eco-responsibility. When it comes to food, meanwhile, eating locally and seasonally are recommended, as is perhaps cutting down on meat.

“I don’t think everyone has to go vegan to make a huge change. The more realistic thing is for the majority of people cutting down meat consumption to a couple of days a week.”

Recycling and reusing materials is always a major environmental aid, and it’s as easy as throwing your plastic water bottle into a blue bin. That simpliness also applies to habits around the house, like turning off the faucet when you’re brushing your teeth or flicking off the lightswitch after leaving a room. You’ll also be saving money if you do the latter.

Californian Firm Introduces Sustainable ‘Mushroom Leather’ As Vegan Alternative 

Dr. Matt Scullin is the CEO of biomaterials company MycoWorks. He recently discussed their newest vegan alternative to leather that could help save more than just animals. The scientists behind the alternative believe that mycelium, a material grown from fungi, could help save the planet as it can be engineered to look and feel like real leather. 

“We’re predicting that mushroom leather could be a sustainability gamechanger, unlocking a future of design which begins with the material, not with the object.”

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Fine Mycelium is a patented material that can be grown from fungi in trays within a matter of weeks. The material replicates both the appearance and feel of leather, while outperforming it in strength and durability. Recently, the material made it’s designer debut as an exclusive Hermès handbag.

“It can give the same emotional response as an animal leather. It has that hand-feel of rarity. On a planet of finite natural resources, both the technology and the mindset of carbon-neutral, grown-to-order mushroom leather could be revolutionary, and have implications for innovation in manufacture beyond fashion,”  says Scullin.

“I’m interested in talking to people in creative industries about how the possibilities of fungi can help open the mind to new ideas. I am excited to support the fashion world in its efforts to become more sustainable. There is so much potential in fungi to overcome some of the problems we face,” says Merlin Sheldrake, author of ‘Entangled Lives: How Fungi Makes Our Worlds, Changes Our Minds, and Shapes Our Futures.’

Mushroom leather can be grown in pieces to a specific shape and size as well, which eliminates the need for cutting and wasting product. A recent report from the Higg Materials Sustainability Index found that bovine leather does more environmental damage than any other fabric, including plastic-based synthetic fabrics. This damage is due to the deforestation and gas emissions associated with harvesting real leather. 

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Leather goods account for about 15% of the luxury market, and scientists believe sustainable alternatives could greatly decrease the fashion industry’s carbon footprint. 

“In order to have a substantial impact on sustainability, the material needs to be accessible at a lower price point. We are working with luxury fashion first because they are ahead of the curve when it comes to sustainability. These are brands which are in a position to think big and to think long term,” says Scullin.

Sheldrake believes that “one of the overarching lessons learned from studying fungi is reforming the way we think about waste. If fungi didn’t do what they do, our planet would be piled metres high in the bodies of animals and plants.”

“We have been trained as consumers to think in terms of a straight line whereby we buy something, use it and throw it away. Fungi can inform thinking about fashion on lots of levels. This is about material innovation, but it’s also about the culture of making endless new things, and what we can learn from thinking in terms of nature and of cycles instead,” he explained.

Travel Landmarks

Tips For Traveling More Ethically And Mentally

For many, travel may still be a pipe dream in a Coronavirus-dominated world, but as some areas of the globe open up to international travel — or even as the prospect of future adventure is still on the cards — can we take the time to learn to be better tourists, backpackers, travellers and so forth? Can we learn how to travel both ethically and mindfully? Some believe so.

A recent article from Lonely Planet astutely pointed out that “often, the personal benefits we gain when traveling come at the expense of the places and people we visit. These include degradation of the environment, threats to local culture and heritage, overcrowding, and residents being priced out of their own cities.”

Jeff Greenwald, executive director of Ethical Traveler, spoke to Lonely Planet explaining that “ethical travel really is simply mindful travel,” and that every traveler has the opportunity to represent not just themselves, but their place of origin.

“It’s travel with an awareness of the places you’re visiting, your impact on those places, where your money is going, and how you can be a good representative of your own country when you travel, rather than just an example of everything that’s wrong with your own country.”

Here are just some of the many that you can travel mindfully. Often mindful travel is aided by researching your destination before you visit under the lens of ethical travel. This way, you can ensure you’ll be aware of tourism problems, be respectful of local customs and be the best mindful traveller you can be.

Nature and Wildlife 

Interactions with local nature reserves and wildlife is one particular area where you can be mindful. Obvious examples include not leaving litter and being respectful of local areas – if the guidelines ask you not to feed the animals, to stay on paths and not trample on the flora and fauna, then do so. These are also good practices to adopt as standard anyway. 

Less obvious ways can be looking into the ethicality of activities. Many activities such as elephant riding, petting tigers, or posing for photos with captive animals are known to be harmful and abusive to the animals. If you are looking to experience the local wildlife, research the activity first – a good rule of thumb is to assume that unusual interactions with wild animal touching, riding, close contact, and so forth will not be ethical. Although many animal sanctuaries help the animals in question, always research into whether it is genuinely ethical before attending.  

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According to Lonely Planet, “[A 2019 Exodus Travels study], which surveyed 2000 internationally-traveling Americans, also revealed that 39 percent feel ‘travel guilt’ over their past experiences abroad, especially if it involved practices like swimming with dolphins or posing for photos with captive wildlife. Respondents say that a combination of personal research, greater concern for the environment, and documentaries like Blackfish have made them more conscientious.”

Support the Locals 

Tourism can be immensely beneficial to countries economically, but often larger corporations benefit from tourism over local communities. Further, the lasting impact of colonization and commercialisation on travel can mean that local communities are not benefiting from tourism but are instead being negatively impacted by it. One example is as popular areas expand for tourism, local people are priced out of living in those areas or do not receive proper money made from their crafts or services – instead, this profit going to larger corporations, often in other countries. In some areas, Native or Indigenous communities are exploited completely. 

Therefore, you can choose to support local businesses, artists, and traders over the larger organizations. This can mean opting to buy souvenirs and gifts from local craftspeople rather than the commercialised airport gift shop. Visiting a locally owned restaurant or reserve, rather than one owned by an offshore business person. Joining local tours and paying local landowners over larger tours. Opting for local services can not only offer richer, authentic, and unique experiences, but can even save you money.

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To find out where the local establishments are, ask residents and people of interest, such as a local taxi driver or accommodation host. There is also a wealth of information on travel blogs and websites that can point you in the right direction. Soon you’ll be a pro at seeking these areas out for yourself. 

The Environment  

Early on in the pandemic, when much of the world was placed into lockdown, images of clear waters, pollution reduction and wildlife returning to areas frequently disrupted by humans dazzled and inspired the world. While many people looked at how quickly damaging human practices can be curbed, this can also be remembered as you travel – from reducing your carbon footprint generally to your direct and immediate effect on the places that you visit. 

Just as it is important to look after the environment in your home country, it is important to do so while travelling. Some poorer countries will be feeling the effects of climate change more than richer ones, and therefore it is all the more important that you take care of the environment.

This can be anything and everything from bringing your own reusable water bottle — check that the water is drinkable before you refill — to renting bicycles rather than taking a taxi. Look up the environmental problems in the area that you are visiting, such as the damage tourists have to coral reefs. Do your best to not add to those problems and reduce your impact. 

United Nations Reports Record High Greenhouse Gas Levels Throughout World 

The United Nations announced this week that greenhouse gas concentrations in our atmosphere hit record levels in 2020, and the world is “way off track on capping rising temperatures.”

The UN’s World Meteorological Organization (WMO) released a report that showed carbon dioxide levels surged to 413.2 parts per million in 2020, which shows an exponential rise in the rate of emissions last year when compared to the rest of the decade. There was, however, a temporary decline in emissions during the initial phase of Covid-19 lockdowns. 

WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said “the current rate of increase in heat-trapping gases would result in temperature rises far in excess of the 2015 Paris Agreement target of 1.5 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial average this century.

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“We are way off track. We need to revisit our industrial, energy and transport systems and whole way of life. We need a dramatic increase in commitments from our world’s nations.”

Glasgow, Scotland hosted the climate talks where the UN met to discuss capping the global warming rates on Earth at the 1.5-2 degrees Celsius upper limit originally set out in the Paris Agreement. 

“It is going to be very, very tough this summit. I am very worried because it might go wrong and we might not get the agreements that we need and it is touch and go, it is very, very difficult, but I think it can be done,” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said during a news conference.

The crown prince of Saudi Arabia claimed that the nation will be aiming to reach net zero emissions of greenhouse gases by 2060, adding that they also plan on doubling emission cuts within the next decade alone. 

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The nation of Ottawa offered an official plan where they would have developed nations donate up to $100 billion a year to poorer countries to tackle climate change by 2023. This plan calls on more developed nations to put in more effort when it comes to helping poorer nations. 

According to a poll performed by Reuters, economists found that hitting the Paris Agreement goal of net-zero carbon emissions will require more investments from richer countries. If the world continues on as it is, the average global temperature will increase by “1.6C, 2.4C and 4.4C by 2030, 2050 and 2100 respectively, which would also result in 2.4% lost output by 2030, 10% by 2050 and 18% by 2100,” according to the median replies to the poll.

In London, climate activists are taking action into their own hands by blockading major roads and disrupting traffic in the city’s financial district; similar protests are occuring all throughout Europe as well. 

“Greenhouse gas emissions are provoking climate catastrophes all over the planet. We don’t have time. It’s already late and if we don’t join the action against what’s happening, we won’t have time to save what is still left,” said Alberto, 27, a sociologist who took part in a sit-in protest in Madrid which blocked off one of the largest shopping streets in the city.

Wildfires

 California Sheriff’s Office Issues Intense Wildfire Warning For Northern Residents

Thousands of residents in Northern California were forced to evacuate their homes this week as US Fire officials continue to fight around 96 large and active fires raging through 2 million acres of forest land. 

The River Fire is what officials are calling the fire that has now raged in Nevada and Placer counties in California. An estimated 40 building structures have been damaged or completely destroyed since Wednesday, when the fires initially began. CalFire Deputy Chief Jim Hudson claimed that the fire has already torn through 1,400 acres of land and was uncontainable Wednesday evening. 

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Nearly 2,400 residents are under evacuation in Placer County alone, and in Nevada County 4,200 residents have now been placed under an evacuation order, according to Sheriff Shannan Moon. 

California’s largest active wildfire — the Dixie Fire — has already torn through Greenville, a town in Plumas County, also in the state’s northern region. “The Dixie Fire pushed into Greenville Wednesday and early indications are there has been significant damage,” California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services spokesman Brian Ferguson said. 

“Right now, there are still a lot of people unfortunately in Greenville that did not evacuate. And so, we are having to deal with that … and get all those folks out,” said Jake Cagle, the operations sections chief for California’s Incident Management Team.

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Currently there are 11 large active fires throughout California and over 420,000 acres of land have been destroyed. Wildfires throughout the US have been fueled by extreme drought, global warming, and low humidity. 

The US Forest Service recently announced it will no longer be using the “let it burn” strategy when it comes to wildfires. Even Governor Gavin Newsom recently spoke out against this strategy in a call to President Joe Biden where he claimed the Forest Service has “a culture that too often is wait and see.”

“We need your help to change the culture in terms of the suppression strategies in this climate literally and figuratively to be more aggressive on these federal fires,” Newsom told Biden.

“The 2021 fire year is different from any before. In short, we are in a national crisis. At times like these, we must anchor to our core values, particularly safety,” said US Forest Service Fire Chief Randy Moore.

“We are in a ‘triage mode’ where our primary focus must be on fires that threaten communities and infrastructure. There is a finite amount of firefighting resources available that must be prioritized and fires will not always get the resources that might be requested,” Moore wrote. 

Renting Clothes Is Less Sustainable Than Throwing Them Away, Study Finds

A recent study performed by the Finnish scientific journal Environmental Research Letters has shown that renting clothes is actually worse for the planet than just throwing them away. Before, renting clothes was thought to be one of the easier solutions when it comes to the sustainability issues the fashion industry has. 

The study specifically looked at the environmental impact of five different ways of owning and disposing of clothing; including renting, resale, and recycling. 

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The study found that “renting clothes had the highest climate impact of all. The hidden environmental cost was found to be delivery and packaging costs. Renting involves a large amount of transportation, taking the clothes back and forth between the warehouse and the renter. Dry cleaning is also harmful to the environment.”

Renting clothing was thought to be one of the more sustainable ways to lessen your impact on the fashion industry’s major sustainability issue. According to GlobalData, the rental clothing industry is expected to be valued at $2.3 billion by 2029. A report from the World Economic Forum suggested that the industry has already generated 5% of global emissions. 

Dana Thomas, author of ‘Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes’, wrote that instead of relying on rental clothing to solve fashion’s environmental crisis, the concept should just be completely recategorized. 

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“We should think of renting like second-hand shopping. It’s not something we do all the time, instead of buying our clothes and swapping out outfits nonstop, but on occasion, when the need arises, like proms or weddings.”

“Many rental brands misuse the term circular economy – the system where clothes are passed from person to person before being recycled – as a form of greenwashing. No executive wants to overhaul their business, and that’s what ‘going green’ will require, not tweaks but an entire overhaul. They are too focused on short-term gains to invest in long-term benefits,” Thomas explained. 

“Only regulation will solve that problem. No company, in any industry, will volunteer to take a loss for the sake of the planet. They’ll do so when it’s the law. The biggest obstacle is greed.”

The study concluded that if rental companies change their logistics to make the process in which they rent out clothes more environmentally friendly, then renting would be at the same level as reselling. 

South Africa

Meet The Black Mambas, A Women-Only Ranger Team Working To Preserve African Wildlife

June 23rd is known as World Female Ranger Day as a means of raising awareness and funding to support the women within the industry who are working hard to preserve the Earth. Only 11% of the world’s global ranger population is made up of women, so the campaign, co-founded by adventurers Holly Budge and Margot Dempsey, works to shed light on the inequalities that exist within the industry. 

The Black Mambas are a women-only team of rangers who work in Africa to preserve the dwindling wildlife population throughout the continent. The group was founded in 2013 when rhino poaching was reaching an unprecedented high in South Africa. 

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The group itself is made up of 36 women all from local tribes who are armed only with pepper spray. They work everyday to patrol the Kruger National Park’s fence lines for unwelcome intruders, as well as checking camera traps and finding snare traps. The group was founded out of this particular national park, which is why they spend a majority of their time there. 

 Nkateko Mzimba joined the team back in 2014 when they began more community outreach efforts as well. Mzimba claimed that the group began connecting with local schools to teach kids about the importance of protecting the Earth and its many inhabitants. 

“We ask our community to change, to protect wildlife for their kids, trying our best to show we love and support them, and we give them food.” 

The Black Mambas have to date reduced bushmeat poaching by 89% and virtually eliminated the use of snare traps. While they themselves are not armed beyond pepper spray, should they come across packers with weapons, they can easily call for armed backup from local authorities. 

“The Black Mambas support me. I am here because of them, and I want to empower them. Women were always undermined. Now, they see the importance of us in the bush. When people offer bribes, we say no – we don’t share information. Some say this is a man’s job, but we’ve proved that we can do this,” Mzimba explained. 

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In Zimbabwe, the first all-female anti-poaching unit was recently established in 2017. Akashinga and the Black Mamba’s amazing efforts in Africa is actually the reason Budge and Dempsey established World Female Ranger Day in the first place. 

“I wanted to bring their stories to the world. Some are AIDS orphans, some come from abusive marriages. Now, they’re breadwinners and their kids go to school. But other women don’t have this success, and World Female Ranger Day will bring their challenges to light.”

“I felt privileged to see their work firsthand. It was like a war zone – the Akashingas all carried AK47s, with wild animals and signs of poachers around us. It made me appreciate how dangerous their work is. They’re not playing rangers. This is real, very real,” Budge explained. 

World Female Ranger Day works to provide an international forum for rangers everywhere to share advice and offer support. 

“We offer grants for improved facilities and equipment, along with annual awards. These rangers are fantastic role models, inspiring and empowering women with a strong message that anything can be overcome with training, self-belief, determination, and resilience,” says Budge.

“On World Female Ranger Day, we’re role models to ladies out there who feel underrated. We need a day to celebrate us. And they need to see us, to be inspired.”